D.C. Comics Presents…

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Darrin Bell

Biden and the Me Too Movement

While I clearly am supportive of the Me Too movement, I am also a skeptic. We must listen to allegations from women, but that doesn’t mean we have to always believe them.3820

I’ve handled at least four cases I can think of off the top of my head where the woman made accusations — some tremendously more serious than this — and then later admitted she had lied. It does happen.

Read this article from a prosecutor who explains why he is skeptical as well.

And then read Biden’s comments this morning denying that anything happened.

Basically, if you read the article and imagine how a defense attorney would handle it in a trial, you’d probably not find him guilty. Then again, the standard of “beyond a reasonable doubt” doesn’t apply to politics. Image is more important than fact.

Mind you, we Democrats tend to be very harsh on our own when these accusations are believable (see what happened to Al Franken). And what bugs me the most about this whole thing is seeing Republicans try to make this into an issue, given their candidate brags about sexually assaulting women.

Another reason why Democrats should have nominated Warren.

Thank you for your service

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David Fitzsimmons

Conservativism is, at its root, all about being selfish

Seriously, that’s what it’s all about. So much of conservative thought (and especially libertarian policy) is about being selfish.

I got mine, so who cares about you?

Programs and policies that benefit them are perfectly acceptable but if it helps anyone else, it’s a waste of government time and money.  Oh sure, they code their selfishness with the word “liberty” but when they talk about liberty they mean they want to do whatever they want and screw anyone else who may be hurt in the process.  “I should have the liberty to discriminate and take away everyone else’s liberty” is what a lot of their argument boils down to.

But let’s be honest here — it’s not just about them personally but their group.  “Our religion needs to have its religious laws forced upon everyone else, but your religion should be banned. Our immigrant forefathers are the core of this country but you immigrants are not welcome. Tax breaks for things we do are reasonable government expenditures but tax breaks for what you do are just plain theft from me.”

The history of progress in America has largely been the fight by liberals against conservatives who selfishly did not want to share what they had: their power, their wealth, their freedoms.

What is the common thread of all of these movements in America?:

  • Abolishing slavery
  • Giving women the right to vote
  • Abolishing child labor
  • Establishing a minimum wage
  • Worker’s rights
  • Civil rights
  • Environmental protection
  • Gay rights

Yes, that’s correct. Liberals supported all of this, and conservatives opposed them, because they didn’t benefit them and in fact, removed many of them from having the power they once held.

And we’re seeing that now. It’s not a coincidence that the conservatives are the ones now protesting quarantines and refusing to protect society in general. You can discuss all sorts of political reasons why that is, but it really boils down to selfishness.

(Note: This is very much a simplification of conservative thought and does not necessarily apply to all government policies such as foreign affairs and such. But it’s useful to remember when you read something about a conservative’s position. Quite often, you can boil it down to selfishness for themselves and people like them.)

EDIT:  I am currently deleting all the replies from people who clearly did not read this article but say “Oh yeah?  Well, a Republican abolished slavery” — when clearly the post talks about liberals and conservatives and not parties in the slightest.  Read some history, pay attention, and maybe read the comments below before making yourself look stupid in public.

Typhoid Mary-onettes

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Steve Sack

Reading “How to Argue the Constitution with a Conservative”

Want to hear the first chapter of my book HOW TO ARGUE THE CONSTITUTION WITH A CONSERVATIVE?  Of course you do!

 

Dare to be stupid

Clay Bennett

Let’s give the Corona Virus the Chinese Food Treatment

by Guest Blogger Steve Vaughan

Our favorite Chinese restaurant is a five-minute drive from our house. For my money–which they get a lot of–it’s the best in town.

Whenever we order from–whether it’s dinner for eight adults or a snack for Alex and me–they give us the same delivery time, “45 minute.” And the food is always here in 30 minutes, tops. And the order is always correct and the food is always great. I’m pretty sure they know the delivery isn’t going to take 45 minutes, but they build in time to deal with complications. If the food gets here in 45 minutes, we’re satisfied.

That’s a smart way to run a business. It’s a smart way to run public policy too.

Unfortunately for us, our favorite restaurant is “closed until further notice.” I’m not sure why. It has a very tiny dining room. I’d think delivery and takeout makes up a big part of their business. I hope no one is ill.

So, when Alex and I wanted Chinese for dinner a couple of weeks ago, we had to try a new place. They were even closer to our house. With a decent size catapult they could literally have thrown the food to our porch.

They promised the food in 30 minutes and got it there in 20, but part of the order was wrong and the rest was awful. To be fair the new place confounded my Egg Roll Test for Chinese restaurants. The egg rolls were good and Alex said his hot and sour soup was delicious. (Yes, my 12-year-old eats hotter food than I do. Don’t judge.)

But when we turned to our entrees the corner cutting was obvious. Alex had his usual, chicken fried rice and I felt like something simple and had shrimp fried rice.
Okay, first, fried rice is supposed to be fried. This was white rice with a few peas and carrots thrown in.

Second, the protein is supposed to be cooked in the rice, at least briefly. Here it had been tossed on top of the previously prepared rice. My entree had tiny pink baby shrimp of the kind I would expect to find garnishing a salad. They tasted okay, but were wrong for the dish.

About 30 seconds after he started his rice, Alex held out a piece of chicken on a fork and said, “Try this.” He was doing that thing where you can’t believe how bad something tastes until you get a second opinion. Although we teach Alex never to spit out food, I spit it into the kitchen trash can. I don’t know what they did to that chicken but they made it foul, not fowl.

And so this restaurant will never get another dollar from us, showing that cutting corners is a bad way to run a business. Or to create public policy. Particularly public health policy.
If you’re following along this far, you probably know where I’m going with this.

The majority of the nation’s governors–Democrats and Republicans alike–and all of our leading healthcare experts are running a good restaurant. They know, that in the biggest public health emergency in 100 years, there are potentially a lot of “unknown unknowns“ out there. So they are setting goals for ending social distancing that are data-driven, which take into account how much we have flattened the curve and the danger of new outbreaks if restrictions are relaxed too soon.

Unfortunately, they are competing with an unlicensed food truck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue.

The administration’s response to this crisis has been driven by everything but the data. By Trump’s arrogance and insecurity. By partisanship. By wishful thinking. And by an almost instinctive anti-intellectualism from the president and his supporters.

Some are saying they are willing to die to restart the economy. You can count me out of storming that hill.

Others, “Corona Virus Resisters,” are flouting state regulations and gathering in large groups. As long as they keep to themselves, great. They will shortly prove Darwin (who they probably don’t believe in) right. However, if they endanger other people, they should be arrested like anyone else who is a threat to public safety.

What the emergence of these groups show is that in the Age of Trump, stupidity is no longer a character trait–it’s an ideology.

These people are fools. Let us not suffer fools gladly.

And let us demand that US public health policy is run at least as well as a good Chinese restaurant.

Steve Vaughan is a reporter and writer residing in Richmond, Virginia. He holds a degree in Political Science from VCU and a masters in Wise Ass from the School of Life.

If all wartime presidents acted like Trump

Rob Rogers

You still have to choose

Bernie has now dropped out of the race, leaving us with Biden as our candidate.

Look, I’m an old guy. The only time my choice in the primaries won the nomination and the presidency was with Obama. I’m used to not always getting my way — that’s how democracy works.

Biden wasn’t even in my top 5 this time, but he’s still going to be a gigantic improvement over Trump. (Hell, most Republicans would be an improvement, so that’s not saying much.)

Refusing to vote for him because he isn’t perfect is like a kid holding his breath till he turns blue and gets his way. Let’s be adults. Sometimes our choices aren’t perfect.choices